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Camp

The Bible

Bible Usage:

Dictionaries:

  • Included in Eastons: Yes
  • Included in Hitchcocks: No
  • Included in Naves: Yes
  • Included in Smiths: Yes
  • Included in Websters: Yes
  • Included in Strongs: Yes
  • Included in Thayers: Yes
  • Included in BDB: Yes

Strongs Concordance:

Easton's Bible Dictionary
Camp

During their journeys across the wilderness, the twelve tribes formed encampments at the different places where they halted (Exodus 16:13; Numbers 2:3). The diagram here given shows the position of the different tribes and the form of the encampment during the wanderings, according to Numbers 1:53; 2:2-31; 3:29, 35, 38; 10:13-28.

The area of the camp would be in all about 3 square miles. After the Hebrews entered Palestine, the camps then spoken of were exclusively warlike (Joshua 11:5, 7; Judges 5:19, 21; 7:1; 1 Samuel 29:1; 30:9, etc.).


Naves Topical Index
Camp

Of the Israelites about the tabernacle
Judges 4:2
Itinerary


Smith's Bible Dictionary
Camp

Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Camp

CAMP, noun

1. The ground on which an army pitch their tents, whether for a night or a longer time.

2. The order or arrangement of tents, or disposition of an army, for rest; as, to pitch a camp Also, the troops encamped on the same field.

3. An army.

CAMP, verb transitive or I. To rest or lodge, as an army, usually in tents; to pitch a camp; to fix tents; but seldom used. [See Encamp.]


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Campaign

CAMPAIGN,

CAMPAIGNER, noun One who has served in an army several campaigns; an old soldier; a veteran.


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Campain

CAMPAIN, noun

1. An open field; a large open plain; an extensive tract of ground without considerable hills. [See Champaign.]

2. The time that an army keeps the filed, either in action, marches, or in camp, without entering into winter quarters. A campaign is usually from spring to autumn or winter; but in some instances, armies make a winter campaign.

CAMPAIGN, verb intransitive To serve in a campaign.


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Campana

CAMPANA, noun The pasque-flower.


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Campaniform

CAMPANIFORM, adjective In the shape of a bell; applied to flowers.


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Campanula

CAMPANULA, noun The bell-flower.


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Campanulate

CAMPANULATE, adjective In the form of a bell.


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Campeachy-wood

CAMPEACHY-WOOD, from Campeachy in Mexico.


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Campestral

CAMPESTRAL,

CAMPESTRIAN, adjective Pertaining to an open field; growing in a field or open ground.


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Camp-fight

CAMP-FIGHT, noun In law writers, a trial by duel, or the legal combat of two champions, for the decision of a controversy. [Camp in W. Is a game, and campiaw is to contend.]


Easton's Bible Dictionary
Camphire

(Heb. copher), mentioned in Song of Solomon 1:14 (R.V., "henna-flowers"); 4:13 (R.V., "henna"), is the al-henna of the Arabs, a native of Egypt, producing clusters of small white and yellow odoriferous flowers, whence is made the Oleum Cyprineum. From its leaves is made the peculiar auburn dye with which Eastern women stain their nails and the palms of their hands. It is found only at Engedi, on the shore of the Dead Sea. It is known to botanists by the name Lawsonia alba or inermis, a kind of privet, which grows 6 or 8 feet high. The margin of the Authorized Version of the passages above referred to has "or cypress," not with reference to the conifer so called, but to the circumstance that one of the most highly appreciated species of this plant grew in the island of Cyprus.


Naves Topical Index
Camphire

A shrub bearing fragrant flowers, not related to camphor.
Song of Solomon 1:14; Song of Solomon 4:13


Smith's Bible Dictionary
Camphire

There can be no doubt that "camphire" is the Lawsonia alba of botanists, the henna of Arabian naturalists. The henna plant grows in Egypt, Syria, Arabia and northern India. The flowers are white and grow in clusters, and are very fragrant. The whole shrub is from four to six feet high, (Solomon 4:13)


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Camphor

CAMPHOR, noun Properly cafor. A solid concrete juice or exudation, from the laurus camphora, or Indian laurel-tree, a large tree growing wild in Borneo, Sumatra, etc. It is a whitish translucent substance, of granular or foliated fracture, and somewhat unctuous to the feel. It has a bitterish aromatic taste, and a very fragrant smell, and is a powerful diaphoretic.

CAMPHOR, verb transitive To impregnate or wash with camphor


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Camphorate

CAMPHORATE, noun In chimistry, a compound of the acid of camphor, with different bases.

CAMPHORATE, adjective Pertaining to camphor, or impregnated with it.


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Camphorated

CAMPHORATED, adjective Impregnated with camphor.


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Camphoric

CAMPHORIC, adjective Pertaining to camphor, or partaking of its qualities.


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Camphor-oil

CAMPHOR-OIL. [See Camphor-tree.]


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Camphor-tree

CAMPHOR-TREE, noun The tree from which camphor is obtained. According to Miller, there are two sorts of trees that produce camphor; one, a native of Borneo, which produces the best species; the other, a native of Japan, which resembles the bay-tree, bearing black or purple berries. But the tree grows also in Sumatra. The stem is thick, the bark of a brownish color, and the ramification strong, close and extended. The, wood is soft, easily worked, and useful for domestic purposes. To obtain camphor, the tree is cut down, and divided into pieces, and the camphor taken out; it being found in small whitish flakes, situated perpendicularly, in irregular veins, in and near the center of the tree. It is then repeatedly soaked and washed in soapy water, to separate from it all extraneous matter. It is then passed through three sieves of different texture, to divide it into three sorts, head, belly and foot camphor. Camphor oil is camphor, before the operations of nature have reduced it to a concrete form; and concrete camphor may be reduced to oil, by the nitric acid.


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Campilla

CAMPILLA, noun A plant of a new genus, used by dyers.


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Camping

CAMPING, participle present tense Encamping.

CAMPING, noun A playing at football.


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Campion

CAMPION, noun A plant, the popular name of the lychnis.