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Corn

The Bible

Bible Usage:

Dictionaries:

  • Included in Eastons: Yes
  • Included in Hitchcocks: No
  • Included in Naves: Yes
  • Included in Smiths: Yes
  • Included in Websters: Yes
  • Included in Strongs: Yes
  • Included in Thayers: Yes
  • Included in BDB: Yes

Strongs Concordance:

Easton's Bible Dictionary
Corn

The word so rendered (dagan) in Genesis 27:28, 37, Numbers 18:27, Deuteronomy 28:51, Lamentations 2:12, is a general term representing all the commodities we usually describe by the words corn, grain, seeds, peas, beans. With this corresponds the use of the word in John 12:24.

In Genesis 41:35, 49, Proverbs 11:26, Joel 2:24 ("wheat"), the word thus translated (bar; i.e., "winnowed") means corn purified from chaff. With this corresponds the use of the word in the New Testament (Matthew 3:12; Luke 3:17; Acts 7:12). In Psalms 65:13 it means "growing corn."

In Genesis 42:1, 2, 19, Joshua 9:14, Nehemiah 10:31 ("victuals"), the word (sheber; i.e., "broken," i.e., grist) denotes generally victuals, provisions, and corn as a principal article of food.

From the time of Solomon, corn began to be exported from Palestine (Ezekiel 27:17; Amos 8:5). "Plenty of corn" was a part of Issac's blessing conferred upon Jacob (Genesis 27:28; comp. Psalms 65:13).


Naves Topical Index
Corn

A general term applied to all grains.

In valleys
Psalms 65:13; Mark 4:28

A product of Egypt
Genesis 41:47-49

A product of Palestine
Deuteronomy 33:28; Ezekiel 27:17

Parched
Ruth 2:14; 1 Samuel 17:17; 1 Samuel 25:18; 2 Samuel 17:28

Ground
2 Samuel 17:19

Eaten by the Israelites
Joshua 5:11-12

Shocks of, burnt
Judges 15:5

Heads of, plucked by Christ's disciples
Matthew 12:1

Mosiac laws concerning
Exodus 22:6; Deuteronomy 23:25

Figurative
Psalms 72:16; Hosea 14:7; John 12:24

Symbolic
Genesis 41:5
Barley; Barn; Bread; First Fruits; Gleaning; Harvest; Reaping; Rye; Threshing; Tithes; Wheat


Smith's Bible Dictionary
Corn

The most common kinds were wheat, barley, spelt, Authorized Version, (Exodus 9:32) and Isaiah 28:25 "Rye;" (Ezekiel 4:9) "fitches" and millet; oats are mentioned only by rabbinical writers. Our Indian corn was unknown in Bible times. Corn-crops are still reckoned at twentyfold what was sown, and were anciently much more. (Genesis 41:22) The Jewish law permitted any one in passing through a field of standing corn to pluck and eat. (23:25) see also Matthew 12:1 From Solomon's time, (2 Chronicles 2:10,15) as agriculture became developed under a settled government, Palestine was a corn-exporting country, and her grain was largely taken by her commercial neighbor Tyre. (Ezekiel 27:17) comp. 30008005


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Corn

CORN, noun [G., Latin See Grain.]

1. A single seed of certain plants, as wheat, rye, barley and maiz; a grain. In this sense, it has a plural; as, three barley corns make an inch. It is generally applied to edible seeds, which, when ripe, are hard.

2. The seeds of certain plants in general, in bulk or quantity; as, corn is dear or scarce. In this sense, the word comprehends all the kinds of grain which constitute the food of men and horses. In Great Britain, corn is generally applied to wheat, rye, oats and barley. In the United States, it has the same general sense, but by custom, it is appropriated to maiz. We are accustomed to say, the crop of wheat is good, but the corn is bad; it is a good year for wheat and rye, but bad for corn In this sense, corn has no plural.

3. The plants which produce corn when growing in the field; the stalks and ears, or the stalks, ears and seeds, after reaping and before thrashing. We say, a field of corn a sheaf or a shock of corn a load of corn The plants or stalks are included in the terms corn until the seed is separated from the ears.

4. In surgery, a hard excrescence, or induration of the skin, on the toes or some part of the feet, occasioned by the pressure of the shoes; so called from its hardness and resemblance to a corn

5. A small hard particle. [See Grain.]

CORN, verb transitive

1. To preserve and season with salt in grains; to sprinkle with salt; as, to corn beef.

2. To granulate; to form into small grains.


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Cornage

CORNAGE, noun [Latin , a horn.] An ancient tenure of lands, which obliged the tenant to give notice of an invasion by blowing a horn.


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Cornamute

CORNELIAN, CORNEMUSE, CORNAMUTE noun A kind of rustic flute.


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Cornbind

CORNBIND, noun Climbing buck-wheat. [Local.]


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Cornblade

CORNBLADE, noun The leaf of the maiz. Cornblades are collected and preserved as fodder, in some of the southern states of America.


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Corn-chandler

CORN-CHANDLER, noun [Chandler, a dealer in candles, is supposed to be from the French chandelier; but what has this word to do with corn and ship, in corn-chandler and ship-chandler? In these words, chandler seems to be a corruption of the Teutonic handler, a trader.] A dealer in corn.


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Cornclad

CORNCLAD, adjective Covered with growing corn.


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Corn-crake

CORN-CRAKE, noun The crake or land rail; the corn-crow, for kraka, in Sw., and krage, in Dan., is our word crow, and the name is probably taken from its cry. The Dutch kraai, a crow, is contracted from kraag, and kraaijen is to crow, to vaunt, to tell tales.


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Corn-cutter

CORN-CUTTER, noun [corn and cut.] One who cuts corns, or indurations of the skin.


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Cornea

CORNEA, noun [Latin , a horn.] The transparent membrane in the fore-part of the eye, through which the rays of light pass; situated in the sclerotica, and considered by some as a portion of it.


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Cornel

CORNEL, CORNEL-TREE, CORNELIAN-TREE, noun [Latin , a horn, or its root, from the hardness of the wood.] The cornelian cherry or dog-wood, a genus of plants of several species. The mascula, or cornelian cherry tree, has a stem of twenty feet high, branching and forming a large head, garnished with oblong leaves and small umbels of yellowish-green flowers, succeeded by small, red, acid, eatable, cherry-like fruit. [See Carnelian.]


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Cornelian

CORNELIAN, CORNEMUSE, CORNAMUTE, noun A kind of rustic flute.


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Cornelian-tree

CORNEL, CORNEL-TREE, CORNELIAN-TREE noun [Latin , a horn, or its root, from the hardness of the wood.] The cornelian cherry or dog-wood, a genus of plants of several species. The mascula, or cornelian cherry tree, has a stem of twenty feet high, branching and forming a large head, garnished with oblong leaves and small umbels of yellowish-green flowers, succeeded by small, red, acid, eatable, cherry-like fruit. [See Carnelian.]


Easton's Bible Dictionary
Cornelius

A centurion whose history is narrated in Acts 10. He was a "devout man," and like the centurion of Capernaum, believed in the God of Israel. His residence at Caesrea probably brought him into contact with Jews who communicated to him their expectations regarding the Messiah; and thus he was prepared to welcome the message Peter brought him. He became the first fruit of the Gentile world to Christ. He and his family were baptized and admitted into the Christian church (Acts 10:1, 44-48). (See CENTURION.)


Hitchcock's Names Dictionary
Cornelius

of a horn


Naves Topical Index
Cornelius

A Roman centurion.
Genesis 44:10


Smith's Bible Dictionary
Cornelius

(of a horn), a Roman centurion of the Italian cohort stationed in C'sarea, (Acts 10:1) etc., a man full of good works and alms-deeds. With his household he was baptized by St. Peter, and thus Cornelius became the firstfruits of the Gentile world to Christ.


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Cornel-tree

CORNEL, CORNEL-TREE CORNELIAN-TREE, noun [Latin , a horn, or its root, from the hardness of the wood.] The cornelian cherry or dog-wood, a genus of plants of several species. The mascula, or cornelian cherry tree, has a stem of twenty feet high, branching and forming a large head, garnished with oblong leaves and small umbels of yellowish-green flowers, succeeded by small, red, acid, eatable, cherry-like fruit. [See Carnelian.]


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Cornemuse

CORNELIAN, CORNEMUSE CORNAMUTE, noun A kind of rustic flute.


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Corneous

CORNEOUS, adjective [Latin , a horn. See Horn.] Horny; like horn; consisting of a horny substance, or substance resembling horn; hard.


Easton's Bible Dictionary
Corner

The angle of a house (Job 1:19) or a street (Proverbs 7:8). "Corners" in Nehemiah 9:22 denotes the various districts of the promised land allotted to the Israelites. In Numbers 24:17, the "corners of Moab" denotes the whole land of Moab. The "corner of a field" (Leviticus 19:9; 23:22) is its extreme part, which was not to be reaped. The Jews were prohibited from cutting the "corners," i.e., the extremities, of the hair and whiskers running round the ears (Leviticus 19:27; 21:5). The "four corners of the earth" in Isaiah 11:12 and Ezekiel 7:2 denotes the whole land. The "corners of the streets" mentioned in Matthew 6:5 means the angles where streets meet so as to form a square or place of public resort.

The corner gate of Jerusalem (2 Kings 14:13; 2 Chronicles 26:9) was on the north-west side of the city.

Corner-stone (Job 38:6; Isaiah 28:16), a block of great importance in binding together the sides of a building. The "head of the corner" (Psalms 118:22, 23) denotes the coping, the "coign of vantage", i.e., the topstone of a building. But the word "corner stone" is sometimes used to denote some person of rank and importance (Isaiah 28:16). It is applied to our Lord, who was set in highest honour (Matthew 21:42). He is also styled "the chief corner stone" (Ephesians 2:20; 1 Peter 2:6-8). When Zechariah (10:4), speaking of Judah, says, "Out of him came forth the corner," he is probably to be understood as ultimately referring to the Messiah as the "corner stone." (See TEMPLE, SOLOMON'S.)


Smith's Bible Dictionary
Corner

The "corner" of the field was not allowed, (Leviticus 19:9) to be wholly reaped. It formed a right of the poor to carry off what was so left, and this was a part of the maintenance from the soil to which that class were entitled. Under the scribes, minute legislation fixed one-sixtieth as the portion of a field which was to be left for the legal "corner." The proportion being thus fixed, all the grain might be reaped, and enough to satisfy the regulation subsequently separated from the whole crop. This "corner" was, like the gleaning, tithe-free.


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Corner

CORNER, noun [See Horn and Grain.]

1. The point where two converging lines meet; properly, the external point; an angle; as, we meet at the corner of the state-house, or at the corner of two streets.

2. The interior point where two lines meet; an angle.

3. The space between two converging lines or walls which meet in a point. Hence,

4. An inclosed place; a secret or retired place.

This thing was not done in a corner Acts 26:26.

5. Indefinitely any part; a part. They searched every corner of the forest. They explored all corners of the country.

6. The end, extremity or limit; as the corners of the head or beard. Leviticus 21:5 and 19.

CORNER-teeth of a horse, the foreteeth between the middling teeth and the tushes, two above and two below, on each side of the jaw, which shoot when the horse is four years and a half old.


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Cornered

CORNERED, adjective Having corners; having three or more angles.


Naves Topical Index
Cornerstone

Smith's Bible Dictionary
Cornerstone

a quoin or cornerstone, of great importance in binding together the sides of a building. The phrase "corner-stone" is sometimes used to denote any principal person, as the princes of Egypt, (Isaiah 19:13) and is thus applied to our Lord. (Isaiah 28:16; Matthew 21:42; 1 Peter 2:6,7)


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Corner-stone

CORNER-STONE, noun The stone which lies at the corner of two walls, and unites them; the principal stone, and especially the stone which forms the corner of the foundation of an edifice.

Who laid the corner-stone thereof? Job 38:1.

Christ himself being the chief corner-stone Ephesians 2:1.


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Corner-wise

CORNER-WISE, adverb Diagonally; with the corner in front; not parallel.


Easton's Bible Dictionary
Cornet

Heb. shophar, "brightness," with reference to the clearness of its sound (1 Chronicles 15:28; 2 Chronicles 15:14; Psalms 98:6; Hosea 5:8). It is usually rendered in the Authorized Version "trumpet." It denotes the long and straight horn, about eighteen inches long. The words of Joel, "Blow the trumpet," literally, "Sound the cornet," refer to the festival which was the preparation for the day of Atonement. In Daniel 3:5, 7, 10, 15, the word (keren) so rendered is a curved horn. The word "cornet" in 2 Samuel 6:5 (Heb. mena'an'im, occurring only here) was some kind of instrument played by being shaken like the Egyptian sistrum, consisting of rings or bells hung loosely on iron rods.


Naves Topical Index
Cornet

See Trumpet
Trumpet


Smith's Bible Dictionary
Cornet

(Heb. shophar), a loud-sounding instrument, made of the horn of a ram or a chamois (sometimes of an ox), and used by the ancient Hebrews for signals, (Leviticus 25:9) and much used by the priests. (1 Chronicles 15:28)


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Cornet

CORNET, noun [Latin , a horn. See Horn.]

1. An instrument of music, in the nature of a trumpet, sounded by blowing with the mouth. It was of a winding shape like a horn; used in armies and on occasions of joy.

David played before the Lord on cornets. 2 Samuel 6:5.

2. In modern usage, an officer of cavalry, who bears the ensign or colors of a troop. He is the third officer in the company.

3. A company of cavalry; a troop of horse. [Not used.]

4. The cornet of a horse [coronet[ is the lowest part of his pastern, that runs round the coffin and is distinguished by the hair that joins and covers the upper part of the hoof.

5. A little cap of paper in which retailers inclose small wares.

6. A scarf anciently worn by doctors.

7. A head dress.


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Cornetcy

CORNETCY, noun The commission or rank of a cornet.


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Corneter

CORNETTER, CORNETER CORNICE, noun One who blows a cornet.


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Cornetter

CORNETTER, CORNETER, CORNICE, noun One who blows a cornet.


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Cornfield

CORNFIELD, noun A field where corn is growing.


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Cornflag

CORNFLAG, noun A genus of plants, the Gladiolus, of several species, bearing red or white flowers.


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Cornfloor

CORNFLOOR, noun A floor for corn, or for thrashing corn. Isaiah 21:10. Hosea 9:1.


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Cornflower

CORNFLOWER, noun A flower or plant growing among corn; as the blue-bottle, wild poppy, etc.


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Cornheap

CORNHEAP, noun A heap of corn.


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Cornice

CORNETTER, CORNETER, CORNICE noun One who blows a cornet.

1. In architecture, the uppermost member of the entablature of a column, or the highest projecture; that which crowns and order.

2. A little projecture in joinery or masonry; as the cornice of a chimney.

Cornice-ring of a cannon, is the ring next from the muzzle-ring backward.


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Cornicle

CORNICLE, noun [Latin , a horn.] A little horn.


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Corniculate

CORNICULATE, adjective [from Latin , a horn.]

1. Horned; having horns.

2. In botany, producing horned pods; bearing a little spur or horn.


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Cornigerous

CORNIGEROUS, adjective [Latin , a horn, to bear.] Horned; having horns; as cornigerous animals.


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Corning-house

CORNING-HOUSE, noun A house or place where powder is granulated.


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Cornish

CORNISH, adjective Pertaining to Cornwall in England; and as a noun, the language of Cornwall.


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Cornist

CORNIST, noun A performer on the cornet or horn.


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Cornland

CORNLAND, noun Land appropriated or suitable to the production of corn, or grain.


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Cornless

CORNLESS, adjective Destitute of corn; as cornless dwelling places.


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Cornloft

CORNLOFT, noun An apartment for corn; a granary.


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Corn-marygold

CORN-MARYGOLD, noun A genus of plants, the Chrysanthemum.


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Cornmaster

CORNMASTER, noun One who cultivates corn for sale. [Not used.]


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Cornmeter

CORNMETER, noun One who measures corn.


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Cornmill

CORNMILL, noun A mill for grinding corn, more generally called a grist-mill.


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Corn-parsley

CORN-PARSLEY, noun A genus of plants, the Sison.


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Cornpipe

CORNPIPE, noun A pipe made by slitting the joint of a green stalk of corn.


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Corn-rocket

CORN-ROCKET, noun A genus of plants, the Bunias.


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Cornrose

CORNROSE, noun A species of poppy, or Papaver.


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Corn-sallad

CORN-SALLAD, noun A plant, a species of valeriana, whose top leaves are said to be a good sallad.


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Cornstalk

CORNSTALK, noun A stalk of corn, particularly a stalk of the maiz.


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Cornucopia

CORNUCOPIA, noun [Latin , a horn, and plenty.]

1. The horn of plenty, an emblem of abundance of fruits.

2. In architecture and sculpture, the figure of a horn, from which fruits and flowers are represented as proceeding.


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Cornute

CORNUTE, verb transitive [Latin , a horn.[ To bestow horns; to cuckold.


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Cornuted

CORNUTED, participle passive or adjective

1. Grafted with horns; horned; cuckolded.

2. In botany, horn-shaped.


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Cornuto

CORNUTO, noun A man that wears the horns; a cuckold.


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Cornutor

CORNUTOR, noun A cuckold-maker.


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Corn-violet

CORN-VIOLET, noun A species of Campanula.


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Corny

CORNY, adjective [Latin , a horn.] Horny; strong, stiff or hard like horn; resembling horn.

CORNY, adjective [from corn.] Producing corn; containing corn.