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East

 

The Bible

Bible Usage:

  • east used 157 times.

Dictionaries:

  • Included in Eastons: Yes
  • Included in Hitchcocks: No
  • Included in Naves: No
  • Included in Smiths: Yes
  • Included in Websters: Yes
  • Included in Strongs: Yes
  • Included in Thayers: Yes
  • Included in BDB: Yes

Strongs Concordance:

Easton's Bible Dictionary
East

1. The orient (mizrah); the rising of the sun. Thus "the east country" is the country lying to the east of Syria, the Elymais (Zechariah 8:7).

(2). Properly what is in front of one, or a country that is before or in front of another; the rendering of the word kedem. In pointing out the quarters, a Hebrew always looked with his face toward the east. The word kedem is used when the four quarters of the world are described (Genesis 13:14; 28:14); and mizrah when the east only is distinguished from the west (Joshua 11:3; Psalms 50:1; 103:12, etc.). In Genesis 25:6 "eastward" is literally "unto the land of kedem;" i.e., the lands lying east of Palestine, namely, Arabia, Mesopotamia, etc.


Smith's Bible Dictionary
East

The Hebrew term kedem properly means that which is before or in front of a person, and was applied to the east form the custom of turning in that direction when describing the points of the compass, before, behind, the right and the left representing respectively east, west, south and north. (Job 23:8,9) The term as generally used refers to the lands lying immediately eastward of Palestine, viz., Arabia, Mesopotamia and Babylonia; on the other hand mizrach is used of the far east with a less definite signification. (Isaiah 42:2,25; 43:5; 46:11)


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
East

EAST, noun [Latin oriens, this word may belong to the root of hoise, hoist.]

1. The point in the heavens, where the sun is seen to rise at the equinox, or when it is in the equinoctial, or the corresponding point on the earth; one of the four cardinal points. The east and the west are the points where the equator intersects the horizon. But to persons under the equinoctial line, that line constitutes east and west.

2. The eastern parts of the earth; the regions or countries which lie east of Europe, or other country. In this indefinite sense, the word is applied to Asia Minor, Syria, Chaldea, Persia, India, China, etc. We speak of the riches of the east the diamonds and pearls of the east the kings of the east

The gorgeous east with richest hand,

Pours on her kings barbaric, pearl and gold.

EAST, adjective Towards the rising sun; or towards the point where the sun rises, when in the equinoctial; as the east gate; the east border; the east side. The east wind is a wind that blows from the east


Easton's Bible Dictionary
East Gate

(Jeremiah 19:2), properly the Potter's gate, the gate which led to the potter's field, in the valley of Hinnom.


Easton's Bible Dictionary
East Sea

(Joel 2:20; Ezekiel 47:18), the Dead Sea, which lay on the east side of the Holy Land. The Mediterranean, which lay on the west, was hence called the "great sea for the west border" (Numbers 34:6).


Naves Topical Index
East Sea

See Dead Sea
Dead Sea


Easton's Bible Dictionary
East Wind

The wind coming from the east (Job 27:21; Isaiah 27:8, etc.). Blight caused by this wind, "thin ears" (Genesis 41:6); the withered "gourd" (Jonah 4:8). It was the cause and also the emblem of evil (Ezekiel 17:10; 19:12; Hosea 13:15). In Palestine this wind blows from a burning desert, and hence is destitute of moisture necessary for vegetation.


Naves Topical Index
East Wind

See Wind
Wind


Easton's Bible Dictionary
East, Children of the

The Arabs as a whole, known as the Nabateans or Kedarenes, nomad tribes (Judges 6:3, 33; 7:12; 8:10).


Easton's Bible Dictionary
Easter

Originally a Saxon word (Eostre), denoting a goddess of the Saxons, in honour of whom sacrifices were offered about the time of the Passover. Hence the name came to be given to the festival of the Resurrection of Christ, which occured at the time of the Passover. In the early English versions this word was frequently used as the translation of the Greek pascha (the Passover). When the Authorized Version (1611) was formed, the word "passover" was used in all passages in which this word pascha occurred, except in Act 12:4. In the Revised Version the proper word, "passover," is always used.


Naves Topical Index
Easter

Smith's Bible Dictionary
Easter

(Acts 12:4) In the earlier English versions Easter has been frequently used as the translation of pascha (passover). In the Authorized Version Passover was substituted in all passages but this; and in the new Revision Passover is used here. [PASSOVER]


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Easter

E'ASTER, noun

A festival of the christian church observed in commemoration of our Savior's resurrection. It answers to the pascha or passover of the Hebrews, and most nations still give it this name, pascha, pask, paque.


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Easterling

E'ASTERLING, noun A native of some country eastward of another.

1. A species of waterfowl.


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Easterly

E'ASTERLY, adjective Coming from the eastward; as an easterly wind.

1. Situated towards the east; as the easterly side of a lake or country.

2. Towards the east; as, to move in an easterly direction.

3. Looking towards the east; as an easterly exposure.

E'ASTERLY, adverb On the east; in the direction of east.


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Eastern

E'ASTERN, adjective Oriental; being or dwelling in the east; as eastern kings; eastern countries; eastern nations.

1. Situated towards the east; on the east part; as the eastern side of a town or church; the eastern gate.

2. Going towards the east, or in the direction of east; as an eastern voyage.


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Eastward

E'ASTWARD, adverb [east and ward.] Toward the east; in the direction of east from some point or place. New Haven lies eastward from New York. Turn your eyes eastward