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Eyes

The Bible

Bible Usage:

Dictionaries:

  • Included in Eastons: Yes
  • Included in Hitchcocks: No
  • Included in Naves: No
  • Included in Smiths: Yes
  • Included in Websters: Yes
  • Included in Strongs: Yes
  • Included in Thayers: Yes
  • Included in BDB: Yes

Strongs Concordance:

Easton's Bible Dictionary
Eye

(Heb. ain, meaning "flowing"), applied (1) to a fountain, frequently; (2) to colour (Numbers 11:7; R.V., "appearance," marg. "eye"); (3) the face (Exodus 10:5, 15; Numbers 22:5, 11), in Numbers 14:14, "face to face" (R.V. marg., "eye to eye"). "Between the eyes", i.e., the forehead (Exodus 13:9, 16).

The expression (Proverbs 23:31), "when it giveth his colour in the cup," is literally, "when it giveth out [or showeth] its eye." The beads or bubbles of wine are thus spoken of. "To set the eyes" on any one is to view him with favour (Genesis 44:21; Job 24:23; Jeremiah 39:12). This word is used figuratively in the expressions an "evil eye" (Matthew 20:15), a "bountiful eye" (Proverbs 22:9), "haughty eyes" (6:17 marg.), "wanton eyes" (Isaiah 3:16), "eyes full of adultery" (2 Peter 2:14), "the lust of the eyes" (1 John 2:16). Christians are warned against "eye-service" (Ephesians 6:6; Colossians 3:22). Men were sometimes punished by having their eyes put out (1 Samuel 11:2; Samson, Judges 16:21; Zedekiah, 2 Kings 25:7).

The custom of painting the eyes is alluded to in 2 Kings 9:30, R.V.; Jeremiah 4:30; Ezekiel 23:40, a custom which still prevails extensively among Eastern women.


Naves Topical Index
Eye

Smith's Bible Dictionary
Eye

(The practice of painting the eyelids to make the eyes look large, lustrous and languishing is often alluded to in the Old Testament, and still extensively prevails among the women of the East, and especially among the Mohammedans. Jezebel, in (2 Kings 9:30) is said to have prepared for her meeting with Jehu by painting her face, or, as it reads in the margin, "put her eyes in paint." See also (Ezekiel 23:40) A small probe of wood, ivory or silver is wet with rose-water and dipped in an impalpable black powder, and is then drawn between the lids of the eye nearly closed, and leaves a narrow black border, which is though a great ornament.

ED.)


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Eye

EYE, noun pronounced as I. [Latin oculus, a diminutive. The old English plural was eyen, or eyne.]

1. The organ of sight or vision; properly, the globe or ball movable in the orbit. The eye is nearly of a spherical figure, and composed of coats or tunics. But in the term eye we often or usually include the ball and the parts adjacent.

2. Sight; view; ocular knowledge; as, I have a man now in my eye In this sense, the plural is more generally used.

Before whose eyes Jesus Christ hath been evidently set forth, crucified among you. Galatians 3:1.

3. Look; countenance.

I'll say yon gray is not the morning's eye

4. Front; face.

Her shall you hear disproved to your eyes.

5. Direct opposition; as, to sail in the wind's eye

6. Aspect; regard; respect; view.

Booksellers mention with respect the authors they have printed, and consequently have an eye to their own advantage.

7. Notice; observation; vigilance; watch.

After this jealousy, he kept a strict eye upon him.

8. View of the mind; opinion formed by observation or contemplation.

It hath, in their eye no great affinity with the form of the church of Rome.

9. Sight; view, either in a literal or figurative sense.

10. Something resembling the eye in form; as the eye of a peacock's feather.

11. A small hole or aperture; a perforation; as the eye of a needle.

12. A small catch for a hook; as we say, hooks and eyes. in nearly the same sense, the word is applied to certain fastenings in the cordage of ships.

13. The bud of a plant; a shoot.

14. A small shade of color. [Little used.]

Red with an eye of blue makes a purple.

15. The power of perception.

The eyes of your understanding being enlightened. Ephesians 1:18.

16. Oversight; inspection.

The eye of the master will do more work than both his hands.

The eyes of a ship, are the parts which lie near the hawse-holes, particularly in the lower apartments.

To set the eyes on, is to see; to have a sight of.

To find favor in the eyes, is to be graciously received and treated.

EYE, noun A brood; as an eye of pheasants.

EYE, verb transitive To fix the eye on; to look on; to view; to observe; particularly, to observe or watch narrowly, or with fixed attention.

EYE nature's walks, shoot folly as it flies.

EYE, verb intransitive To appear; to have an appearance.