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Food

The Bible

Bible Usage:

  • food used 55 times.

Dictionaries:

  • Included in Eastons: Yes
  • Included in Hitchcocks: No
  • Included in Naves: Yes
  • Included in Smiths: Yes
  • Included in Websters: Yes
  • Included in Strongs: Yes
  • Included in Thayers: Yes
  • Included in BDB: Yes

Strongs Concordance:

Easton's Bible Dictionary
Food

Originally the Creator granted the use of the vegetable world for food to man (Genesis 1:29), with the exception mentioned (2:17). The use of animal food was probably not unknown to the antediluvians. There is, however, a distinct law on the subject given to Noah after the Deluge (Genesis 9:2-5). Various articles of food used in the patriarchal age are mentioned in Genesis 18:6-8; 25:34; 27:3, 4; 43:11. Regarding the food of the Israelites in Egypt, see Exodus 16:3; Numbers 11:5. In the wilderness their ordinary food was miraculously supplied in the manna. They had also quails (Exodus 16:11-13; Numbers 11:31).

In the law of Moses there are special regulations as to the animals to be used for food (Leviticus 11; Deuteronomy 14:3-21). The Jews were also forbidden to use as food anything that had been consecrated to idols (Exodus 34:15), or animals that had died of disease or had been torn by wild beasts (Exodus 22:31; Leviticus 22:8). (See also for other restrictions Exodus 23:19; 29:13-22; Leviticus 3:4-9; 9:18, 19; 22:8; Deuteronomy 14:21.) But beyond these restrictions they had a large grant from God (Deuteronomy 14:26; 32:13, 14).

Food was prepared for use in various ways. The cereals were sometimes eaten without any preparation (Leviticus 23:14; Deuteronomy 23:25; 2 Kings 4:42). Vegetables were cooked by boiling (Genesis 25:30, 34; 2 Kings 4:38, 39), and thus also other articles of food were prepared for use (Genesis 27:4; Proverbs 23:3; Ezekiel 24:10; Luke 24:42; John 21:9). Food was also prepared by roasting (Exodus 12:8; Leviticus 2:14). (See COOK.)


Naves Topical Index
Food

Smith's Bible Dictionary
Food

The diet of eastern nations has been in all ages light and simple. Vegetable food was more used than animal. The Hebrews used a great variety of articles, (John 21:5) to give a relish to bread. Milk and its preparations hold a conspicuous place in eastern diet, as affording substantial nourishment; generally int he form of the modern leben , i.e. sour milk. Authorized Version "butter;" (Genesis 18:8; Judges 5:25; 2 Samuel 17:29) Fruit was another source of subsistence- figs stood first in point of importance; they were generally dried and pressed into cakes. Grapes were generally eaten in a dried state as raisins. Of vegetables we have most frequent notice of lentils, beans, leeks, onions and garlic, which were and still are of a superior quality in Egypt. (Numbers 11:5) Honey is extensively used, as is also olive oil. The Orientals have been at all times sparing in the use of animal food; not only does the extensive head of the climate render it both unwholesome to eat much meat and expensive from the necessity of immediately consuming a whole animal, but beyond this the ritual regulations of the Mosaic law in ancient, as of the Koran in modern, times have tended to the same result. The prohibition expressed against consuming the blood of any animal, (Genesis 9:4) was more fully developed in the Levitical law, and enforced by the penalty of death. (Leviticus 3:17; 7:26; 19:26; 12:16) Certain portions of the fat of sacrifices were also forbidden, (Leviticus 3:9,10) as being set apart for the altar, (Leviticus 3:16; 7:25) In addition to the above, Christians were forbidden to eat the flesh of animals portions of which had been offered to idols. All beasts and birds classed as unclean, (Leviticus 11:1) ff.; Deuteronomy 14:4 ff., were also prohibited. Under these restrictions the Hebrews were permitted the free use of animal food- generally speaking they only availed themselves of it in the exercise of hospitality or at festivals of a religious, public or private character. It was only in royal households that there was a daily consumption of meat. The animals killed for meat were

calves, lambs, oxen not above three years of age, harts, roebucks and fallow deer; birds of various kinds; fish, with the exception of such as were without scales and fins. Locusts, of which certain species only were esteemed clean, were occasionally eaten, (Matthew 3:4) but were regarded as poor fare.


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Food

FOOD, noun [See Feed.]

1. In a general sense, whatever is eaten by animals for nourishment, and whatever supplies nutriment to plants.

2. Meat; aliment; flesh or vegetables eaten for sustaining human life; victuals; provisions; whatever is or may be eaten for nourishment.

Feed me with food convenient for me. Proverbs 30:8.

3. Whatever supplies nourishment and growth to plants, as water, carbonic acid gas, etc. Manuring substances furnish plants with food

4. Something that sustains, nourishes and augments. Flattery is the food of vanity.

FOOD, verb transitive To feed. [Not in use.]


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Foodful

FOOD'FUL, adjective Supplying food; full of food.


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Foodless

FOOD'LESS, adjective Without food; destitute of provisions; barren.


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Foody

FOOD'Y, adjective Eatable; fit for food. [Not used.]