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Reproach

The Bible

Bible Usage:

Dictionaries:

  • Included in Eastons: No
  • Included in Hitchcocks: No
  • Included in Naves: No
  • Included in Smiths: No
  • Included in Websters: Yes
  • Included in Strongs: Yes
  • Included in Thayers: Yes
  • Included in BDB: Yes

Strongs Concordance:

Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Reproach

REPROACH, verb transitive [Latin prox, in proximus.]

1. To censure in terms of opprobrium or contempt.

Mezentius with his ardor warm'd his fainting friends, reproach'd their shameful flight, repell'd the victors.

2. To charge with a fault in severe language.

That shame there sit not, and reproach us as unclean.

3. To upbraid; to suggest blame for any thing. A man's conscience will reproach him for a criminal, mean or unworthy action.

4. To treat with scorn or contempt. Luke 6:22.

REPROACH, noun

1. Censure mingled with contempt or derision; contumelious or opprobrious language towards any person; abusive reflections; as foul-mouthed reproach

2. Shame; infamy; disgrace.

Give not thine heritage to reproach Joel 2:17. Isaiah 4:1.

3. Object of contempt, scorn or derision.

Come, and let us build up the wall of Jerusalem, that we may be no more a reproach Nehemiah 2:17.

4. That which is the cause of shame or disgrace. Genesis 30:23.


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Reproachable

REPROACHABLE, adjective

1. Deserving reproach.

2. Opprobrious; scurrilous. [Not proper.]


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Reproached

REPROACHED, participle passive Censured in terms of contempt; upbraided.


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Reproachful

REPROACHFUL, adjective

1. Expressing censure with contempt; scurrilous; opprobrious; as reproachful words.

2. Shameful; bringing or casting reproach; infamous; base; vile; as reproachful conduct; a reproachful life.


Webster's 1828 Dictionary
Reproachfully

REPROACHFULLY, adverb

1. In terms of reproach; opprobriously; scurrilously

1 Timothy 5:14.

2. Shamefully; disgracefully; contemptuously.